Sake varieties

WHAT IS NIGORI?

Nigorizake is made from moromi that is filtered through rough cloth right before fermentation is complete. In nigori, the sweetness of the rice is easily tasted. Some nigoris are of the sparkling variety because when nigori is done pre-fermenting, the carbonation remains.
WHAT IS GENSHU? - Genshu is raw, undiluted sake It is moromi (mash) that is heated, filtered, and has no added water. It is then bottled immediately. Genshu has an alcohol content of 20-22%. Most of the sake to hit the consumer market is not genshu. The sake has water added reducing the actual content to 15-16%.

WHAT IS NAMA?

Namazake has water added but is not pasteurized (heated) as is most of the sake that makes its way to market. This is why Namazake tastes so fresh. It is!!

WHAT IS NAMA GENSHU?

This sake has no water added, and it is not pasteurized. It is fresh, undiluted sake

WHAT IS NAMA CHOZO?

The distinguishing characteristic in its development is that namachozo only carries out one of the two heating processes (pasteurizations) used to produce regular sake. 

WHAT IS NAMAZUME?

This sake is the polar opposite of the Nama chozo, because it goes through the first heating prior to the storage process but does not undergo a second heating prior to bottling.

WHAT IS SHIN-SHU?

This is the first sake of the year, once fermenting and bottling are complete.

WHAT IS HIYAOROSHI?

A rare, seasonal sake only released during the fall, with a profile that is often complex and robust. Hiyaoroshi is brewed in or around March, aged in the cool area under the brewery over the summer months, and is then released for a very limited time as fall opens. It is well suited for pairing with fall delicacies.

WHAT IS KIMOTO?

Normally sake brewers introduce a lactic acid into the fermentation process for cultivating yeast, in order to prevent harmful bacteria from taking over. This is a new custom since the early 1900's. Kimoto is an original sake making style, and lactic acid is not added to it, but instead lactic acid is allowed to naturally develop. This process takes double the time of the modern way, and thanks to this and the natural elements, taste of Kimoto is strong.
Additionally, in the Kimoto style, Kurabito (sake brewery workers) would painstakingly pound and pulverize steamed rice grains with wooden oars, because it was believed that sake would only ferment if they did so. This backbreaking work was deemed unnecessary in 1909, birthing the Yamahai style. 

WHAT IS YAMAHAI?

Yamahai is made in the same way as Kimoto, except that in brewing Yamahai the steaming rice is NOT pulverized with a stick to facilitate dissolving. Yamahai has Koji added to dissolve the rice. Similar to Kimoto, Yamahai has the peculiar taste and Umami (flavor) of natural rice.

WHAT IS KOSHU?

This is an aged sake. There is no regulation concerning the exact time which must elapse before it will be known as 'Koshu' officially. But it is well known that if the sake has been aged more than 3 years, it qualifies to be called 'Koshu'.